X

Detailed View

The Real College Survey analyzes food and shelter insecurity

The Real College Survey analyzes food and shelter insecurity

By Taylor Hutchison Indy Staff Writer

Wednesday, November 13, 2019 | Number of views (745)

The Real College Survey

Across the nation, the Real College Survey started Fall 2019 ending October 31, and collected data from colleges such as Fort Lewis College. The survey is a national benchmark survey conducted by the Temple University Hope Center regarding food and shelter security for college students.

Student Body President Cody Stroup sent an email on Monday asking students to participate in the survey. 

“They’re conducting a survey to see what students are facing, as far as challenges on campus,” Stroup said. “This is anything from food and shelter security to mental health, health in general.”

The results of the survey will then be shared with administration, who will use it to shape resources on campus, he said. 

Jeffery Dupont, Associate Vice President of Student Affairs, said he first heard about the initiative from a “state consortium,” or an association of representatives, for higher education in Colorado. They wanted to learn more about food and shelter security on campus.

Dupont said he attended a meeting with that state consortium about the need for awareness of the federally funded resources that are available to college students. At the meeting, Dupont said they spoke about how many students in Colorado are eligible for nutrition funding specifically, such as SNAP, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program.

SNAP was previously known as food stamps. Not many students are aware that they may access this resource, he said.

Dupont and other representatives were asked to take the survey to their colleges. This way, there is a better understanding of what food insecurity looks like for college students in Colorado, he said. 

Dupont said that he hopes that once he receives the survey results, he will have a better idea of where students basic needs are not being met so that he can work to provide appropriate resources. 

The survey is expected to take about 15 minutes, but Stroup said that he finished in less than that amount of time. 

There is a $100 incentive to be awarded to 10 survey respondents, he said.

If the college were to receive more resources as a result of the survey, it may come in the form of an outreach person on campus, Dupont said. This outreach person would dedicate their time to educating students about SNAP and the application process. 

Dupont said the state approached him with this suggestion, and should the survey results demonstrate a need for such a resource, the state would provide funding for it. 

Dupont will receive the results for FLC January 2020, and the results for the nation February 2020.

Stroup said that students will be affected because the results influence strategic changes made by the administration regarding the resources made available to students. In the near future, ASFLC will be conducting their own survey regarding student needs for the same reason, he said. 

 

Resources Available Now

The resources currently avaiable include the Grub Hub, which serves one free hot meal a day and is open one day a week to give food away from their pantry, he said. 

Students can be referred to SNAP resources at the Skyhawk Station. Students who are referred are put in contact with an outreach worker that walks students through the process of how to apply for SNAP, he said. 

To be referred to the food bank, students may go to Title IX Coordinator Molly Wiser with student affairs or Academic Services Coordinator Emma Salazar with TRIO, Dupont said.

Dupont said he also recommends that students take advantage of Manna Soup Kitchen, which serves two hot meals a day. They also pack lunches for those who can’t make it to breakfast or lunch, he said. 

Manna Soup Kitchen does not require any income verification, so students don’t need a referral, he said.

“People are willing to help without a lot of stipulations as to what you need to do to get the help,” Dupont said.

Print

Number of views (745)/Comments (0)

Please login or register to post comments.

Breaking
Chains, Whips and Nipple Clamps: BDSM meets Colonialism

Chains, Whips and Nipple Clamps: BDSM meets Colonialism

By Amber Labahe Indy Staff Writer
4/30/2020
This year, the Sundance Film Festival previewed a script about a Native dominatrix for hire finding healing by whipping white supremacists and...
Number of views (5486)
COVID-19 impacts FLC students

COVID-19 impacts FLC students

Indy Staff Collaboration
4/26/2020
As we know, for many, COVID-19 has turned the world completely upside down. Fort Lewis College students have had many changes to their jobs,...
Number of views (1525)
Sustaibably cultivating a garden: a student’s guide to growing their own food

Sustaibably cultivating a garden: a student’s guide to growing their own food

By Coya Pair Indy Staff Writer
4/26/2020
Students can grow their own food, whether it is indoors, outdoors or through volunteering at community gardens. Though giving space, time or money...
Number of views (1379)

FLC faculty calls for awareness of indigenous history through class curriculums

By Will Charles Indy Staff Writer
3/10/2020
Some professors of Fort Lewis faculty support the idea of issuing mandatory courses that inform FLC students, faculty and staff  about their...
Number of views (5806)
RSS
Advertise with us

Would you like to advertise your business, event or cause with the Independent?

The Independent gives clients the opportunity to reach one of the best target markets in the Durango Area.

Various advertising options are available. Visit our advertising page for more information!

2020-AWLS-SCI-Indy-ad


The Independent | Fort Lewis College | 1000 Rim Drive | Durango, CO 81301 | 970-247-7405 |  independent@fortlewis.edu